Splunk 4 Review

For this weeks tool review, we’re looking at Splunk. Splunk is a log collection engine at heart, but it’s really more than that. Think of it as search engine for your IT infrastructure. Splunk will actually collect and index anything you can throw at it, and this is what made me want to explore it.

Setting up your Splunk server is easy, there’s installers for every major OS. Run the installer and visit the web front end, and you are in business. Set up any collection sources you need, I started off with syslog. I started a listener in Splunk, and then forwarded my sources to Splunk (I used syslog-ng for this). Splunk will also easily do WMI polling, monitoring local files, change monitoring, or run scripts to generate any data you want. Some data sources require running Splunk as an agent, but it goes easy on system resources as the GUI is turned off. Installing agents is exactly the same process — you just disable the GUI when you’re finished setting up; however you can still control Splunk through the command line.

Splunk can also run addons, in the form of apps. These are plugins that are designed to take and display certain information. There are quite a few, provided both by the Splunk team and also some created by third parties. I found the system monitoring tools to be very helpful. There are scripts for both Windows and Unix. In this instance, it does require running clients on the system. There are also apps designed for Blue Coat, Cisco Security and more.

In my time using Splunk, I’ve found it to be a great tool for watching logs for security issues (brute forcing ssh accounts for example), it was also useful in fine tuning my egress filtering, as I could instantly see what was being blocked by the firewall, and of course the system monitoring aspects are useful. It could find a home in any organization, and it plays nice with other tools or could happily be your main log aggregation system.

Splunk comes in two flavors, free and professional. There’s not a great difference between them. The biggest difference is that with the free version Splunk is limited to 500MB of indexing per day, which proves to be more than enough for most small businesses, and testing for larger environments. Stepping up to the professional version is a lot easier on the pockets than might be expected, only about $3,000.

What We Love About Netsparker

Netsparker Professional Edition, by Mavituna Security, is a web application scanner focused on finding unknown flaws in your applications. It can find a wide range of vulnerabilities including SQL injection, cross-site scripting, local and remote file inclusion, command injection and more.

Installation of the software was easy, and as Mavituna Security touts, the license is non-obtrusive. Starting the application you are presented with a nice well designed gui, that shows quite a lot of information. To start a scan, it can be as simple as just putting in a URL. It is very easy for non-security professionals to setup and use. There are also profiles you can configure and save. It’s possible to configure a form login through a very well designed wizard.

The main draw of Netsparker is the confirmation engine, which is how Netsparker claims to be false positive free. The confirmation engine takes the vulnerability and actually confirms that it’s exploitable. If it’s exploitable, it’s definitely not a false positive. A neat feature of identified SQL injection vulnerabilities is the ability for Netsparker to allow you to exploit them right through the scanner. You can run SQL queries, or even open a shell (depending on DB and configuration of it). Directory traversal vulnerabilities can be exploited to download the whole source of the application since Netsparker already knows all the files, and other system files can also be retrieved and saved through the interface.

We set Netsparker to scan our Web application lab which contains known vulnerabilities that cover the OWASP Top Ten Project. We noticed that Netsparker did a very good job at spidering and finding a high number of attack surfaces. On vulnerabilities, Netsparker did a great job of finding SQL injections, cross site scripting, and directory traversals. On one vulnerability, I thought I may have made Netsparker report a confirmed false positive, but it turns out I was wrong after I used the built in query maker and ran one and got data back.

Overall I think Netsparker is an excellent tool, especially effective at finding SQL injections and cross-site issues. Of course, I wouldn’t say it was the only scanner you should have, but definitely consider adding it to your repertoire.

McAfee Update Causing System Problems

McAfee’s Anti-Virus update for today (5958 DAT April 21, 2010) is causing systems to be stuck in an infinite reboot cycle. If your systems have not updated yet, it is highly recommended to prevent them from doing so, disable automatic updates and any pending update tasks.

The issue comes from the update detecting a false positive on systems. It appears that only Windows XP SP3 systems are effected. McAfee detects this false positive in the file C:/WINDOWS/system32/svchost.exe and thinks it contains the W32/Wecorl.a Virus. The machine then enters a reboot cycle.

McAfee has released a temporary fix to suppress the false positive. To use the fix with VirusScan Enterprise Console 8.5i or higher, Access Protection must be first disabled by following this knowledge base article here. (Alternate Google cache page, site is very busy here.)

To correct a machine with this issue, follow these steps:

1. Download the EXTRA.DAT file here. (Or from the KB article)
2. Start the effected machine in Safe Mode
3. Copy the EXTRA.DAT file to the following location:
\Program Files\Common Files\McAfee\Engine
4. Remove svchost.exe from the quarantine.

If You’re Still Using IE6, Read This!

We still see an alarming number of users visiting our sites using Internet Explorer 6 (IE6). Although for the first time, IE8 and IE7 both had a slightly higher share than IE6.

We urge users who continue to use IE6 to update to IE7 or IE8, or switch to an alternative as soon as possible. There are numerous reasons for this. IE6 has been shown many times to be insecure, lacking privacy options, has no protection from XSS or phishing attacks, and it’s not compliant with common web standards. It’s also much slower than modern browsers, particuarly with javascript.

Upgrading your browser can have many benefits. The most important being enhanced security and privacy. Other benefits include a better browsing experience through better compliance and faster rendering. So please, upgrade your browsers!

Malware Attacks Through Ads On The Rise

Traditionally, we thought malware spreading ads were relegated to the sketchy dark corners of the Internet. Lately though, malware spreading ads have increasingly popped up on sites such as eweek.com, bostonherald.com, and foxnews.com.  How is this happening?

In this case, it’s not a vulnerability on the sites in question. The attackers have turned their attention to the ad networks themselves. In some cases, attackers are submitting ads to the ad networks and having them served.  In some other cases, it seems that the ad networks are suffering from vulnerabilties that are being exploited, allowing the attackers to insert malicous code into otherwise legitmate ads.

The malicious ads are doing a variety of different things to attack the end user. The most recent one makes a popup that looks very much like the real Windows Security Center, detailing that your system is infected with some large number of trojans and viruses. The ad claims that it can ‘fix’ your system by installing a tool. Ads have also been seen that were sending a PDF that contains exploits for the recent Adobe Acrobat vulnerabilties.

The best defenses against these attacks are following the tried and true measures. Make sure your OS, browser, and all software is as up to date as possible. Using anti-virus software, as well as regular anti-malware/spyware scans will also help. Consider using a tool such as Secunia PSI, to help make sure 3rd party aps are up to date. Always use safe browsing sensibility, don’t click on anything suspicious, even if it’s from a website you would normally trust. Remember, there are no safe websites.

Holiday Reminder

Just a little Holiday reminder. As we get nearer to popular Holiday’s we normally see an increase in malware attacks. Remember not to open any “e-cards” or other assorted potentially malicious email from random addresses, and closely examine any that appear to come from a trusted source, such as a co-worker.

Spam Bots

We are continuing to see more and more spam bots. Spammers are not letting up and are still actively researching and breaking “captchas”. We have seen several of them broken within the past few weeks. It seems it’s about time to adopt a new system of anti-bot measures for registration forms, or increase the complexity of the captcha (while also increasing user frustration).

That reminds me of a study I was reading about spam though. The researchers in this study found that only about 1 in 12.5 million spams result in a sale of whatever was being spammed about. However, even with this atrocious rate, the spammers are estimated to be generating around $7,000 a day!

MS08-067 Gone To Worm

A worm has been spotted in the wild that is exploiting the MS08-067 vulnerability for which Microsoft released an out-of-band update for yesterday. We urge you to update as soon as possible as there is now working code in the wild. All servers should be patched, especially external ones. If for some reason you have RPC exposed to the world, a very close look should be given to those systems as they may have already been compromised. Internal systems should be patched as soon as possible since this is now a worm, a worm that could be brought in through laptops or other means of access.
A little info on the worm itself, it has been dubbed Gimmiv.A. When the worm executes it will drop three files, winbase.dll, basesvc.dll and syicon.dll into the %System%\Wbem\basesvc.dll. It will then install a service named BaseSvc which will then force svchost.exe to load the trojan dlls. The trojan will collect data from the machine, including passwords, and send them to a remote machine.

Critical Windows Update

Today Microsoft is rolling out an unscheduled update. This vulnerability is critical and there are reports that it has been exploited by malware for the last few weeks. The most vulnerable systems are Windows 2000, Windows XP and Windows 2003. On these systems it is possible exploit the system without authentication. On Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008, the exploit requires authentiation to run, it would likely also lead to a Denial of Service condition due to the use of DEP and ASLR in these versions of Windows.

This is the first vulnerability that can be easily wormable in the past few years. It is very important that this update be tested and rolled out by your organization as soon as possible to prevent exploitation. The Security Bulletin can be found here.

HPSS And OSSEC

I’d like to go over some of the tools that we mention on the blog. The first one I’d like to take a look at is OSSEC. You may have heard of us talking about it before, we mentioned it a few days ago. That was in relation to HoneyPoints and using OSSEC as another layer of your “defense in depth” strategy. I’ll explain what it does, and how it can help you.

First of all, what is OSSEC? OSSEC is an acronym for “Open Source Host-based Intrusion Detection System”. From the name you can see it’s a Host-based Intrusion Detection System (HIDS). As a HIDS it has the capability to do log analysis, integrity checking, Windows registry monitoring (and event log), rootkit detection, real-time alerting and active response against malicious hosts. It can be run locally, or as a centralized system with agents running on hosts.

So how does OSSEC relate to HoneyPoint? Well they both watch different things, and complement each other. While HoneyPoints are psuedo services and capture traffic from them, OSSEC watches real services for probes and compromises. It does this largely by a system of log analysis. I won’t go into it deeply, but the log analysis rules are very configurable, chainable, and fairly easy to write for anyone that knows regex and has a familiarity of basic scripting language.

With OSSEC’s active monitoring, it’s possible for the host to dynamically write firewall rules to block that host. Similar to HoneyPoints Plugin interface, with which you could also use to write a plugin to do that. You could even use OSSEC to watch your HoneyPoint Console syslogs and integrate HoneyPoint Console triggers with its own active response rules, to centralize blocking of hosts between HPSS and OSSEC.

As you can see, OSSEC can work quite nicely with HoneyPoint Security Server as part of a “defense in depth” strategy. There’s no single tool to “rule them all”, so to speak, so it’s important to watch from multiple perspectives! If you want to check out OSSEC, you can visit www.ossec.net.