Malware Can Hide in a LOT of Places

This article about research showing how malware could be hidden in Blu-Ray disks should serve as a reminder to us all that a lot of those “smart” and “Internet-enabled” devices we are buying can also be a risk to our information. In the past, malware has used digital picture frames, vendor disks & CD’s, USB keys, smart “dongles” and a wide variety of other things that can plug into a computer or network as a transmission medium.

As the so called, Internet of Things (IoT), continues to grow in both substance and hype, more and more of these devices will be prevalent across homes and businesses everywhere. In a recent neighbor visit, I enumerated (with permission), more than 30 different computers, phones, tablets, smart TV’s and other miscellaneous devices on their home network. This family of 5 has smart radios, smart TVs and even a Wifi-connected set of toys that their kids play with. That’s a LOT of places for malware to hide…

I hope all of us can take a few minutes and just give that some thought. I am sure few of us really have a plan that includes such objects. Most families are lucky if they have a firewall and AV on all of their systems. Let alone a plan for “smart devices” and other network gook.

How will you handle this? What plans are you making? Ping us on Twitter (@lbhuston or @microsolved) and let us know your thoughts.

Pay Attention to this Samba Vulnerability

We have a feeling that this recent Samba vulnerability should be at the top of your mind. We are seeing a lot of attention to this across a variety of platforms and we wanted to make sure you saw it. It should be patched as soon as possible, especially on highly sensitive data stores and critical systems.

Let us know if you have any questions.

Keep Your Hands Off My SSL Traffic

Hey, you, get off my digital lawn and put down my binary flamingos!!!!! 

If you have been living under an online rock these last couple of weeks, then you might have missed all of the news and hype about the threats to your SSL traffic. It seems that some folks, like Lenovo and Comodo, for example, have been caught with their hands in your cookie jar. (or at least your certificate jar, but cookie jars seem like more of a thing…) 

First, we had Superfish, then PrivDog. Now researchers are saying that more and more examples of that same code being used are starting to emerge across a plethora of products and software tools.

That’s a LOT of people, organizations and applications playing with my (and your) SSL traffic. What is an aging infosec curmudgeon to do except take to the Twitters to complain? :)

There’s a lot of advice out there, and if you are one of the folks impacted by Superfish and/or PrivDog directly, it is likely a good time to go fix that stuff. It also might be worth keeping an eye on for a while and cleaning up any of the other applications that are starting to be outed for the same bad behaviors.

In the meantime, if you are a privacy or compliance person for a living, feel free to drop us a line on Twitter (@lbhuston, @microsolved) and let us know what your organization is doing about these issues. How is the idea of prevalent man-in-the-middle attacks against your compliance-focused data and applications sitting with your security team? You got this, right? :)

As always, thanks for reading, and we look forward to hearing more about your thoughts on the impacts of SSL tampering on Twitter! 

Telnet!? Really!?

I was recently analyzing data from the HITME project that was collected during the month of January. I noticed a significant spike in the observed attacks against Telnet. I was surprised to see that Telnet was being targeted at such a high rate. After all, there can’t be that many devices left with Telnet exposed to the internet, right?

Wrong. Very wrong. I discovered that there are still MILLIONS of devices with Telnet ports exposed to the internet. Due to Telnet’s lack of security, be sure to use SSH as opposed to Telnet whenever possible. If you absolutely must control a device via Telnet, at least place it behind a firewall. If you need to access the device remotely, leverage the use of a VPN. Finally, be sure to restrict access to the device to the smallest possible IP range.

The map below shows the geographical locations and number of attacks against Telnet that we observed last month. If you need any help isolating Telnet exposures, feel free to contact us by emailing info <at>

Screen Shot 2015-02-10 at 11.28.10 AM


RansomWeb Attacks Observed in HITME

Unfortunately, the destructive nature of Ransomware has taken a new turn for the worse.  A new technique called RansomWeb is affecting production web-based applications.  I recently analyzed data from the HITME project and observed several RansomWeb attacks against PHP applications.  I can only assume the frequency of these attacks will increase throughout the year.  As a former Systems Administrator, I can definitively say that it would be a nightmare to bring an application back online that was affected by this variant of Ransomware.  Due to RansomWeb’s destructive nature, it is important to ensure that your organization is actively working to prevent RansomWeb from destroying any critical systems.

The attackers begin the RansomWeb process by exploiting a vulnerability within a web server or web-based application.  Once the server or application have been exploited, the attackers slowly begin encrypting key databases and files.  Once the encryption is complete, the hackers shut down the website/application and begin to demand ransom in exchange for the decryption of the corporation’s files.  Unfortunately, the attackers have even perfected using this process to encrypt system-level backups.

To prevent RansomWeb from affecting your organization, please be sure to complete the following steps on a regular basis:

  • Perform regular vulnerability assessments and penetration testing against your critical applications and servers.
  • Audit your application and system logs for any irregular entries.
  • Verify that you are performing regular application and system backups.
  • Be sure to test the backup/ restore process for your applications and systems on a regular basis.  After all, your backup/ DR process is only as effective as your last successful restore.

If you would like to discuss how we can help you prevent RansomWeb from affecting your production applications, do not hesitate to contact us by emailing info <at>

Recently Observed Attacks By Compromised QNAP Devices

Despite the fact that the Shellshock bug was disclosed last fall, it appears that a wide variety of systems are still falling victim to the exploit.  For example, in the last 30 days, our HoneyPoint Internet Threat Monitoring Environment has observed attacks from almost 1,000 compromised QNAP devices.  If you have QNAP devices deployed, please be sure to check for the indicators of a compromised system.  If your device has not been affected, be sure to patch it immediately.

Once compromised via the Shellshock bug, the QNAP system downloads a payload that contains a shell script designed specifically for QNAP devices.  The script acts as a dropper and downloads additional malicious components prior to installing the worm and making a variety of changes to the system.  These changes include: adding a user account, changing the device’s DNS server to, creating an SSH server on port 26 and downloading/installing a patch from QNAP against the Shellshock bug.

The map below shows the locations of compromised QNAP systems that we observed to be scanning for other unpatched QNAP systems.  If you have any questions regarding this exploit, feel free to contact us by emailing info <at>

Screen Shot 2015-01-27 at 1.41.31 PM

Spike in HITME NTP Probes Following Recent Exploits

For those of you that are unfamiliar with the HITME project, it is a set of deployed HoneyPoints that gather real-world, real-time attacker data from around the world. The sensors gather attack sources, frequency, targeting information, vulnerability patterns, exploits, malware and other crucial event data for the technical team at MSI to analyze. We frequently feed these attack signatures into our vulnerability management service to ensure that our customers are tested against the most current forms of attacks being used on the Internet.
On a monthly basis, we have been taking a step back and looking at our HITME data from a bird’s eye view to find common attack patterns.  Throughout December, we observed a significant increase in attacks against Port 123 (NTP).  This is due to the recent discovery of a vulnerability within NTP.
A majority of the attacks we observed against Port 123 appeared to originate out of the United States of America, Germany, Switzerland, Russia, and China. 
PastedGraphic 2
This vulnerability should be addressed as soon as possible as exploits are publicly available.  All NTP Version 4 releases prior to Version 4.2.8 are vulnerable and need to be updated to Version 4.2.8.  Do not hesitate to contact us at if you require any assistance in responding to this vulnerability.

This blog post by Adam Luck.

5 Ways My Medical Background Makes Me a Better Intelligence Analyst

When I first started for MicroSolved, Inc.(MSI), I wasn’t sure what to think, but now that I have been here for nearly three months I feel I am starting to get the hang of  what it is to be an intelligence analyst. At least a little bit anyhow. Now mind you I am not your typical intelligence analyst, nor am I a new college graduate, but rather I am coming to MSI from the health care industry with over twenty years of work experience in that industry. This was a completely different mindset, with a whole host of new things for me to experience and learn. For me this was totally refreshing and exactly what I wanted and more importantly, needed! There are a few things that I have noticed in my short time here that could be considered pearls of wisdom rather than actual characteristics of a good employee that I feel make me a good intelligence analyst for MSI. Perhaps they are one and the same. At least that is my hope 😉

First, while I am not a seasoned IT professional like so many others that I work with, I am not naive to the fact that there are deadlines and expectations thrust upon all of us. This in my opinion is no different than in being in the hospital setting where people expect you to act quickly and in the best interests of your patient at all times. Couldn’t we say the same is true working for a company like MSI?  In that it is the expectation to be professional, performing your best at all times, and the like? I would like to think that is what I strive for.

After thinking a bit longer perhaps it is that we share a tenacity for getting to the bottom of whatever mystery that we are looking at. Whether it is a series of questions that we may be asking our patients in an effort to try to figure out what ailment they be suffering from. This is not unlike when we are looking for a key bit of code for an algorithm to help us do our work more efficiently. Regardless, it is this mentality of never giving up! To keep fighting, keep looking, to keep trying. Just keep chipping away at it. 

I think the next characteristic would have to be patience. Something that we all have often heard from our grandparents growing up as children. Something that in my mind and in my experience has played a provocative role in both my dealings with patients, their families and with challenging projects in the IT world. Now while as I previously stated in the above paragraph that tenacity plays a role, I also think having a measure of patience does too. There are times in the medical world where even the most experienced physician stands there for a moment and scratches his or her head and says “I don’t know”. Now to a patient that is the last thing that they want to here, but sometimes we truly have to “wait and see”. Sometimes grandma was right! There have been times while working on projects with MSI, where sitting back even if it’s just a few moments, allowed me to gain a better “bird’s eye view” of a given project and really helped me figure out what it was that I was looking for and ultimately aided the project.

Another area that I think gives me an edge would be that I am willing to go the extra mile and I am not afraid to work hard to attain my goals. It isn’t enough to just punch a clock or be mediocre! I have told this to my children, my patients and my friends. Never give up, always work your butt off for what you want in life! It may take time for what you want to come to fruition, but if you’re willing to put the time, energy and effort into it, then it will come!  It takes sacrifice to get to your goals. Others will recognize your efforts and aid you in your path. That’s what I feel MSI has done and is continuing to do for me!

Lastly, laugh! I have not laughed so hard in any of my previous work experiences as compared to working for MSI these past few months. Don’t get me wrong there were plenty of wonderful times, but here at MSI it is a whole new animal! Yes, we work hard, but I think having a healthy sense of humor and a desire to see others laugh is what really sets MSI apart. If you are down, they help pick you up! So often we spend our work lives with people that aren’t our family for hours on end. Shouldn’t we have some fun while we work? If you are lucky enough you do. Then, by choice those people that aren’t your family start to become them and find a place in your heart. Then, your work doesn’t seem like work anymore. 

Yes it’s true that I am new to the world of information technology as a career choice, but that doesn’t mean that I don’t have some very real life experiences to draw upon. Remember, it is a combination of work ethic, tenacity, patience, a sense of humor and ultimately a willingness to never give up. These are the things that will make you successful, not only in your career path, but in life as well. These are my little pearls of wisdom, just a few tidbits of information to help you get to where you want to be in life. Who knows it might even be right here at MSI.

This post by Preston Kershner.

Heads Up, ICS & SCADA Folks, Especially!

Remotely exploitable vulnerabilities have been identified & published in NTP (network time protocol). This is often a CRITICAL protocol/instance for ICS environments and can be widely located in many control networks. 

The fix currently appears to be an upgrade to 4.2.8 or later.

This should be considered a HIGH PRIORITY for critical infrastructure networks. Exploits are expected as this is an unauthenticated remotely triggered buffer overflow, which should be easily implemented into existing exploit kits.

Please let us know if we can assist you in any way. Stay safe out there! 

Update: 12/19/14 2pm Eastern – According to this article, exploits are now publicly available.

Here’s Why You Don’t Want RDP on the Internet

For those of you that are unfamiliar with the HITME project, it is a set of deployed HoneyPoints that gather real-world, real-time attacker data from around the world. The sensors gather attack sources, frequency, targeting information, vulnerability patterns, exploits, malware and other crucial event data for the technical team at MSI to analyze. We frequently feed these attack signatures into our vulnerability management service to ensure that our customers are tested against the most current forms of attacks being used on the Internet.

It’s also important that we take a step back and look at our HITME data from a bird’s-eye view to find common attack patterns. This allows us to give our customers a preemptive warning in the event that we identify a significant increase in a specific threat activity. We recently analyzed  some of the data that we collected during the month of November. We found that over 47% of the observed attacks in the public data set were against the Remote Desktop Protocol (RDP)(often also known as Microsoft Terminal Services). This was more than attacks against web servers, telnet servers and FTP servers combined!

Be sure that all recommended security measures are applied to RDP systems. This should include requiring the use of RDP clients that leverage high levels of encryption. If you need any assistance verifying that you are protected against attacks against your terminal servers, feel free to contact us by sending an email to info(at)microsolved(dot)com.

This post by Adam Luck.