Petya/PetyaWrap Threat Info

As we speak, there is a global ransomware outbreak spreading. The infosec community is working together, in the open, on Twitter and mailing lists sharing information with each other and the world about the threat. 

The infector is called “Petya”/“PetyaWrap” and it appears to use psexec to execute the EternalBlue exploits from the NSA.

The current infector has the following list of target file extensions in the current (as of an hour ago) release. https://twitter.com/bry_campbell/status/879702644394270720/photo/1

Those with robust networks will likely find containment a usual activity, while those who haven’t implement defense in depth and a holistic enclaving strategy are likely in trouble.

Here are the exploits it is using: CVE-2017-0199 and MS17-010, so make sure you have these patched on all systems. Make sure you find anything that is outside the usual patch cycle, like HVAC, elevators, network cameras, ATMs, IoT devices, printers and copiers, ICS components, etc. Note that this a combination of a client-side attack and a network attack, so likely very capable of spreading to internal systems… Client side likely to yield access to internals pretty easily.

May only be affecting the MBR, so check that to see if it is true for you. Some chatter about multiple variants. If you can open a command prompt, bootrec may help. Booting from a CD/USB or using a drive rescue tool may be of use. Restore/rebuild the MBR seems to be successful for some victims. >>  “bootrec /RebuildBcd bootrec /fixMbr bootrec /fixboot” (untested)

New Petrwrap/Petya ransomware has a fake Microsoft digital signature appended. Copied from Sysinternals Utils. – https://t.co/JooBu8lb9e

Lastline indicated this hash as an IOC: 027cc450ef5f8c5f653329641ec1fed91f694e0d229928963b30f6b0d7d3a745 – They also found these activities: https://pbs.twimg.com/media/DDVj-llVYAAHqk4.jpg

Eternal Blue detection rules are firing in several detection products, ET Rules firing on that Petya 71b6a493388e7d0b40c83ce903bc6b04  (drops 7e37ab34ecdcc3e77e24522ddfd4852d ) – https://twitter.com/kafeine/status/879711519038210048

Make sure Office updates are applied, in addition to OS updates for Windows. <<Office updates needed to be immune to CVE-2017-0199.

Now is a great time to ensure you have backups that work for critical systems and that your restore processes are functional.

Chatter about wide scale spread to POS systems across europe. Many industries impacted so far.

Bitdefender initial analysis – https://labs.bitdefender.com/2017/06/massive-goldeneye-ransomware-campaign-slams-worldwide-users/?utm_source=SMGlobal&utm_medium=Twitter&utm_campaign=labs

Stay safe out there! 

 

3:48pm Eastern

Update: Lots of great info on detection, response, spread and prevention can be found here: https://securelist.com/schroedingers-petya/78870/

Also, this is the last update to this post unless something significant changes. Follow me on Twitter for more info: @lbhuston 

State Of Security Podcast Episode 13 Is Out

Hey there! I hope your week is off to a great start.

Here is Episode 13 of the State of Security Podcast. This new “tidbit” format comes in under 35 minutes and features some pointers on unusual security questions you should be asking cloud service providers. 

I also provide a spring update about my research, where it is going and what I have been up to over the winter.

Check it out and let me know what you think via Twitter.

Segmenting With MSI MachineTruth

Many organizations struggle to implement network segmentation and secure network enclaves for servers, industrial controls, SCADA or regulated data. MicroSolved, Inc. (“MSI”) has been helping clients solve information security challenges for nearly twenty-five years on a global scale. In helping our clients segment their networks and protect their traffic flows, we identified a better approach to solving this often untenable problem.

That approach, called MachineTruth™, leverages our proprietary machine learning and data analytics platform to support our industry leading team of experts throughout the process. Our team leverages offline analysis of configuration files, net flow and traffic patterns to simplify the challenge. Instead of manual review by teams of network and systems administrators, MachineTruth takes automated deep dives into the data to provide real insights into how to segment, where to segment, what filtering rules need to be established and how those rules are functioning as they come online.

Our experts then work with your network and security teams, or one of our select MachineTruth Implementation Partners, to guide them through the process of installing and configuring filtering devices, detection tools and applications needed to support the segmentation changes. As the enclaves start to take shape, ongoing oversight is performed by the MSI team, via continual analytics and modeling throughout the segmentation effort. As the data analysis and implementation processes proceed, the controls and rules are optimized and transitioned to steady state maintenance.

Lastly, the MSI team works with the segmentation stakeholders to document, socialize and transfer knowledge to those who will manage and support the newly segmented network and its various enclaves for the long term. This last step is critical to ensuring that the network changes and segmentation initiatives remain in place in the future.

This data-focused, machine learning-based approach enables segmentation for even the most complex of environments. It has been used to successfully save hundreds of man-years of labor and millions of dollars in overhead costs. It has reduced the time to segment international networks from years to months, while significantly raising the quality and security of the new environments. It has accomplished these feats, all while reducing network downtime, outages and potentially dangerous misconfiguration issues.

If your organization is considering or in the process of performing network segmentation for your critical data, you should take a look at the MachineTruth approach from MSI. It could mean the difference between success and struggle for this critical initiative.


Last Quick and Dirty Log Tip for the Week

OK, so this week I posted two other blog posts about doing quick and dirty log analysis and some of the techniques I use. This one also covers converting column logs to CSV.

After the great response, I wanted to drop one last tip for the week. 

Several folks asked me about re-sorting and processing the column-based data in different ways and to achieve different analytical views. 

Let me re-introduce you to my friend and yours, sort.

In this case, instead of using the sort -n -r like before (numeric sort, reverse order), we can use:

  • sort -k# -n input_file (where # is the number of the column you’d like to sort by and the input file is the name of the file to sort)
    • You can use this inline by leveraging the pipe (|) again – i.e.: cat input.txt | sort -k3 -n (this types the input file and sends it to sort for sorting on the third column in numeric order) (-r would of course, reverse it…)
    • You can write the output of this to a file with redirects “> filename.txt”, i.e.: cat input.txt | sort -k3 -n -r > output.txt
      • You could also use “>>” as the redirect in order to create a file if it doesn’t exist OR append to a file if it does exist… i.e..:  cat input.txt | sort -k3 -n -r >> appended_output.txt

That’s it! It’s been a fun week sharing some simple command line processing tips for log files. Drop me a line on Twitter (@lbhuston) and let me know what you used them for, or which ones are your favorite. As always, thanks and have a great weekend! 

Quick And Dirty Log Analysis Followup

Earlier this week, I posted some tips for doing Quick and Dirty PA Firewall Log Analysis.

After I posted this, I got a very common question, and I wanted to answer it here.

The question is something along the lines of “When I use the techniques from your post, the outputs of the commands are column separated data. I need them to be CSV to use with my (tool/SEIM/Aunt Gracie/whatever). How can I convert them?” Sound familiar?

OK, so how do we accomplish this feat of at the command line without all of the workarounds that people posted, and without EVER loading Excel? Thankfully we can use awk again for this.

We can use:

  • awk ‘BEGIN { OFS = “,”} ; {print $1,$2,$3}’
    • Basically, take an input of column data, and print out the columns we want (can be any, in this case I want the first 3 columns), and make the outputs comma delimited.
    • We can just append this to our other command stacks with another pipe (|) to get our output CSV
  • Example: cat log.csv | awk ‘BEGIN { FS = “,”} ; {print $8,$9}’ | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -n -r | awk ‘BEGIN { OFS = “,”} ; {print $1,$2,$3}’
    • In this example, the source IP and destination IP will be analyzed, and the reduced to unique pairs, along with the number of times that that pair is duplicated in the input log (I use this as a “hit rate” as I described earlier
      • A common question, why do I ask for two columns in the first awk and then ask for three columns in the second awk?
        • The answer of course, is that the first awk prints the unique pairs, but it also adds a column of the “hit rate”, so to get the output appropriately, I need all three fields.

So, once again, get to know awk. It is your friend.:)

PS – Yes, I know, there are hundreds of other ways to get this same data, in the same format, using other command line text processing tools. Many may even be less redundant than the commands above. BUT, this is how I did it. I think it makes it easy for people to get started and play with the data. Post your ways to Twitter or share with the community. Exploration is awesome, so it will encourage users to play more. Cool! Hit me on Twitter if you wanna share some or talk more about this approach (@lbhuston).

Thanks for reading!

Quick & Dirty Palo Alto Log Analysis

OK, so I needed to do some quick and dirty traffic analysis on Palo Alto text logs for a project I was working on. The Palo Alto is great and their console tools are nice. Panorama is not too shabby. But, when I need quick and dirty analysis and want to play with data, I dig into the logs. 
 
That said, for my quick analysis, I needed to analyze a bunch of text logs and model the traffic flows. To do that, I used simple command line text processing in Unix (Mac OS, but with tweaks also works in Linux, etc.)
 
I am sharing some of my notes and some of the useful command lines to help others who might be facing a similar need.
 
First, for my project, I made use of the following field #’s in the text analysis, pulled from the log header for sequence:
  • $8 (source IP) 
  • $9 (dest IP)
  • $26 (dest port)
  • $15 (AppID)
  • $32 (bytes)
 
Once, I knew the fields that corresponded to values I wanted to study, I started using the core power of command line text processing. And in this case, the power I needed was:
  • cat
  • grep
    • Including, the ever useful grep -v (inverse grep, show me the lines that don’t match my pattern)
  • awk
    • particularly: awk ‘BEGIN { FS = “,”} ; {print $x, $y}’ which prints specific columns in CSV files 
  • sort
    • sort -n (numeric sort)
    • sort -r (reverse sort, descending)
  • uniq
    • uniq -c (count the numbers of duplicates, used for determining “hit rates” or frequency, etc.)
 
Of course, to learn more about these commands, simply man (command name) and read the details. 😃 
 
OK, so I will get you started, here are a few of the more useful command lines I used for my quick and dirty analysis:
  • cat log.csv | awk ‘BEGIN { FS = “,”} ; {print $8,$9,$26}’ | sort | uniq -c | sort -n -r > hitrate_by_rate.txt
    • this one produces a list of Source IP/Dest IP/Dest Port unique combinations, sorted in descending order by the number of times they appear in the log
  • cat log.csv | awk ‘BEGIN { FS = “,”} ; {print $8,$9}’ | sort -n | uniq -c | sort -n -r > uniqpairs_by_hitrate.txt
    • this one produces a list of the uniq Source & Destination IP addresses, in descending order by how many times they talk to each other in the log (note that their reversed pairings will be separate, if they are present – that is if A talks to B, there will be an entry for that, but if B initiates conversations with A, that will be a separate line in this data set)
  • cat log.csv | awk ‘BEGIN { FS = “,”} ; {print $15}’ | sort | uniq -c | sort -n -r > appID_by_hitrate.txt
    • this one uses the same exact techniques, but now we are looking at what applications have been identified by the firewall, in descending order by number of times that application identifier appears in the log
 
Again, these are simple examples, but you can tweak and expand as you need. This trivial approach to command line text analysis certainly helps with logs and traffic data. You can use those same commands to do a wondrous amount of textual analysis and processing. Learn them, live them, love them. 😃 
 
If you have questions, or want to share some of the ways you use those commands, please drop us a line on Twitter (@microsolved) or hit me up personally for other ideas (@lbhuston). As always, thanks for reading and stay safe out there! 

An Exercise to Increase IT/OT Engagement & Cooperation

Just a quick thought on an exercise to increase the cooperation, trust and engagement between traditional IT and OT (operational technology – (ICS/SCADA tech)) teams. Though it likely applies to just about any two technical teams, including IT and development, etc.

Here’s the idea: Host a Hack-a-thon!

It might look something like this:

  • Invest in some abundant kits of LittleBits. These are like Legos with electronics, mechanical circuits and even Arduino/Cloud controllers built in. Easy, safe, smart and fun!
  • Put all of the technical staff in a room together for a day. Physically together. Ban all cell phones, calls, emails, etc. for the day – get people to engage – cater in meals so they can eat together and develop rapport
  • Split the folks into two or more teams of equal size, mixing IT and OT team members (each team will need both skill sets – digital and mechanical knowledge) anyway.
  • Create a mission – over the next 8 hours, each team will compete to see who can use their smart bits set to design, program and proto-type a solution to a significant problem faced in their everyday work environments.
  • Provide a prize for 1st and 2nd place team. Reach deep – really motivate them!
  • Let the teams go through the process of discussing their challenges to find the right problem, then have them use draw out their proposed solution.
  • After lunch, have the teams discuss the problems they chose and their suggested fix.Then have them build it with the LittleBits. 
  • Right before the end of the day, have a judging and award the prizes.

Then, 30 days later, have a conference call with the group. Have them again discuss the challenges they face together, and see if common solutions emerge. If so, implement them.

Do this a couple times a year, maybe using something like Legos, Raspberry Pis, Arduinos or just whiteboards and markers. Let them have fun, vent their frustrations and actively engage with one another. The results will likely astound you.

How does your company further IT/OT engagement? Let us know on Twitter (@microsolved) or drop me a line personally (@lbhuston). Thanks for reading! 

Hurricane Matthew Should Remind You to Check Your DR/BC Plans

The news is full of tragedy from Hurricane Matthew at the moment, and our heart goes out to those being impacted by the storm and its aftermath.

This storm is a powerful hit on much of the South East US, and should serve as a poignant reminder to practice, review and triple check your organization’s DR and BC plans. You should have a process and procedure review yearly, with an update at least quarterly and anytime major changes to your operations or environment occur. Most organization’s seem to practice these events on a quarterly or at least 2x per year cycle. They often use a full test once a year, and table top exercises for the others. 

This seems to be an effective cycle and approach. 

We hope that everyone stays safe from the hurricane and we are hoping for minimal impacts, but we also hope that organizations take a look at their plans and give them a once over. You never know when you just might need to be better prepared.

Yahoo Claims of Nation State Attackers are Refuted

A security vendor claims that the Yahoo breach was performed by criminals and not a nation state.

This is yet more evidence that in many cases, focusing on the who is the wrong approach. Instead of trying to identify a specific set of attacker identities, organizations should focus on the what and how. This is far more productive, in most cases.

If, down the road, as a part of recovery, the who matters to some extent (for example, if you are trying to establish a loss impact or if you are trying to create economic defenses against the conversion of your stolen data), then might focus on the who at that point. But, even then, performing a spectrum analysis of potential attackers, based on risk assessment is far more likely to produce results that are meaningful for your efforts. 

Attribution is often very difficult and can be quite misleading. Effective incident response should clearly focus on the what and how, so as to best minimize impacts and ensure mitigation. Clues accumulated around the who at this stage should be archived for later analysis during recovery. Obviously, this data should be handled and stored carefully, but nonetheless, that data shouldn’t derail or delay the investigation and mitigation work in nearly every case.

How does your organization handle the who evidence in an incident? Let us know on Twitter (@microsolved) and we will share the high points in a future post.